The Nature of Anime Fandom “Discussion”

Icon-AnimeIcon-MOEThe “#EducateAnime” movement has popped up recently. It’s growing, but where it goes still remains to be seen. The premise is to encourage discussion and debate, and discourage blind hatred and negativity.

Longtime She’s Lost Control readers might recognize this as everything I’ve been on about since before this site launched, back when I was on Blogspot and writing for The Moé Coalition.

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The Resistance to the Moé Discussion

After 77 pages, the comment thread for the ANNCast episode in which I discussed moé with Zac Bertschy was locked. It was locked after a 20+ page argument about feminism, misogyny, and men’s rights activism. This was after the thread had derailed several times and I had intervened to put the thread back on track. After a certain point, I just gave up.

This was supposed to be a discussion about cartoons.

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Why We Need the Moé Discussion to Happen

We’re quickly catching up to the Japanese industry. Nowadays, it’s possible to watch new anime within a day or so of its airing in Japan, which wasn’t possible just a few years ago. It’s nice to be able to ride the nuance and freshness of being this close to the source time-wise, but the speed at which we’re catching up to the Japanese industry has caused problems as well.

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Discussion and Frustration

I get frustrated from time to time looking at some of the things other anime fans complain and argue about. I feel like, if one tenth of this kind of energy was put into having a worthwhile discussion about issues that can affect our understanding of this medium and how we engage with other fans who enjoy it, we’d be closer to being a more cohesive community.

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Why the Anti-Moé Brigade Suppresses the Moé Discussion.

I’ve mentioned previously how the Anti-Moé Brigade has worked to suppress moé discussion: They’re dismissive, derisive, they spread negative connotations without thinking, and they ostracize moé otaku from the greater anime community.

Why, though? Why actively suppress legitimate discourse about any aspect of anime discussion?

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Moe Discussion – Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather!

bright sun shining over city

Learn about heat-related illness and how to stay cool and safe in hot weather.

High temperatures kill hundreds of people every year. Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet more than 700 people die from extreme heat every year in the United States.

Take measures to stay cool, remain hydrated, and keep informed. Getting too hot can make you sick. You can become ill from the heat if your body can’t compensate for it and properly cool you off. The main things affecting your body’s ability to cool itself during extremely hot weather are:

  • High humidity. When the humidity is high, sweat won’t evaporate as quickly. This keeps your body from releasing heat as fast as it may need to.
  • Personal factors. Age, obesity, fever, dehydration, heart disease, mental illness, poor circulation, sunburn, and prescription drug and alcohol use all can play a role in whether a person can cool off enough in very hot weather.

Senior woman drinking from water bottle outdoors with senior man wiping face with towel in background
People age 65 and older are at high risk for heat-related illnesses.

Those who are at highest risk include people 65 and older, children younger than two, and people with chronic diseases or mental illness.

Closely monitor people who depend on you for their care and ask these questions:

  • Are they drinking enough water? Learn more about meticore.
  • Do they have access to air conditioning?
  • Do they need help keeping cool?

People at greatest risk for heat-related illness can take the following protective actions to prevent illness or death:

  • Stay in air-conditioned buildings as much as you can. Contact your local health department or locate an air-conditioned shelter in your area. Air-conditioning is the number one way to protect yourself against heat-related illness and death. If your home is not air-conditioned, reduce your risk for heat-related illness by spending time in public facilities that are air-conditioned and using air conditioning in vehicles.
  • Do not rely on a fan as your main cooling device during an extreme heat event.
  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Check more about metabolic greens plus healthy supplements.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you.
  • Don’t use the stove or oven to cook—it will make you and your house hotter.

Even young and healthy people can get sick from the heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities during hot weather:

  • Limit your outdoor activity, especially midday when the sun is hottest.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Pace your activity. Start activities slow and pick up the pace gradually.
  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink more. Muscle cramping may be an early sign of heat-related illness.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.

How the Anti-Moé Brigade Has Prevented a Genuine Dialogue About Moé

The Anti-Moé Brigade, for all their touted intellectualism, has, for the most part, been very resistant to any actual discussion about moé. They’ll certainly talk about how much it moé sucks and how horrible it is that we aren’t getting more REDLINEs and Cowboy Bebops, but when it comes to actually discussing moé, intellectualism seems to take a back seat to plain old anti-otakuism.

(Bonus content at the bottom, courtesy of the Anti-Moé Brigade)

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